Cape Clear Island, County Cork Fanad Head Lighthouse, County Donegal Valentia Island, County Kerry Maghery Beach, Dungloe, County Donegal Puffin, Great Skellig, County Kerry Birds Carrowmore, County Sligo Clogher Strand, County Kerry Benbulben , County Sligo Roscommon Castle, County Roscommon Dún Beag Fort, County Kerry Seals Howth Harbour Lighthouse, County Dublin Sheep Fields Boat, Cape Clear Island, County Cork Baily Lighthouse, Howth Head, County Dublin Fields Great Skellig, County Kerry

County Galway

County Galway is situated on the west coast, and it's second largest county in Ireland. It is divided into two contrasting regions separated from each other by Lough Corrib (the largest lake in Republic of Ireland). To the east of the lake extends the fertile limestone plain, which is mostly agricultural area. The west of County Galway has much more varied landscape, which is formed by jagged coastline, moors, hills and bogs. The north west part of county, called Connemara, is the one of most popular tourist places in Ireland. It's unspoilt, picturesque region dominated by the rocky mountain range known as the Twelve Bens (or Twelve Pins) and Maamturk mountains. This is also homeland of the sturdy Connemara Pony. Ireland’s most famous islands, The Aran Islands are located just off the coast of Galway. The three islands, Inishmore, Inishmaan and Inisheer are probably most traditional nook Ireland where the time stopped. You will find there old cottages, stone fences, unique woolen products, traditional Irish music at its best and first of all, the Irish language which is still in everyday use. In addition to this, there are many interesting pre-christian and early christian monuments. Visting County Galway you can't miss Galway City itself, which stands deep in Galway Bay on the southern tip of Lough Corrib. The city is known for its vibrant lifestyle and numerous important festivals including the summer’s Galway Arts Festival and a September Oyster Festival. Galway is often referred to as the “Cultural Capital of Ireland” as it is most associated with the Irish language, music, song and dance traditions. Is also home to Ireland's only Irish-language theatre “Taibhdhearc na Gaillimhe”.

Interesting places in county Galway

Kylemore Abbey

Kylemore Abbey

West Ireland | County Galway

Kylemore Abbey is located in the heart of Connemara in County Galway and is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Ireland. Before it became home for Irish Benedictine Nuns it was a privat castle built by Mitchell Henry in 1860's as gift for his wife Margaret. The estate was designed by James Franklin Fuller and is beautifully situated on lake shore,...   more info and photos

Cleggan Court Tomb

Cleggan Court Tomb

West Ireland | County Galway

Cleggan Court Tomb is situated on the northern shore of Cleggan Bay (County Galway) within a few meters of a low cliff which rises about 9m above the sea level. The monument is aligned ESE-WNW, with the entrance towards east. The gallery contains three separated chambers, of which only the middle one retains a large roofstone (3m long, 1.7m wide and up to 0....   more info and photos

Clonfert Cathedral

Clonfert Cathedral

West Ireland | County Galway

The small Cathedral located in Clonfert, in east County Galway is truly a hidden gem, which has one of the best examples of Hiberno-Romanesque decoration in Ireland. The first early Christian monastery was established here in the 6th century by St Brendan the Navigator and it's said that the Saint himself is buried in the churchyard. The monastery was a impo...   more info and photos

Athenry Castle

Athenry Castle

West Ireland | County Galway

The castle located in Athenry, County Galway was built around 1235 by Meiler de Bermingham as a anglo-norman stronghold. Because of strong resistance of native population, in 1346 Athenry was enclosed by defensive walls with six tower gates of which five is still standing. Initially the castle had only two storeys, the basement with vaulted celling at groun...   more info and photos

Finnertys Mills

Finnertys Mills

West Ireland | County Galway

Finnerty's Mills are located in Leitrim, 10 km southeast from Loughrea, in County Galway. This working, water-powered Corn Mill is a wonderful example of industrial heritage dating from early 19th century, and it remains in the hands of the Finnerty's family through all this time. This mill was mainly used to grind corn and various grain but in its heyday th...   more info and photos

Oceans Alive Visitor Centre

Oceans Alive Visitor Centre

West Ireland | County Galway

The Oceans Alive Visitor Centre is located on the Wild Atlantic Way in Derryinver (about 3,5 km north of Letterfrack towards Renvyle), in Connemara, County Galway. The exhibition contains artifacts and comprehensive information about the offshore wildlife and impact of the ocean on Connemara region. There are also many very interesting exhibits associated wi...   more info and photos

Clontuskert Augustinian Priory

Clontuskert Augustinian Priory

West Ireland | County Galway

The ruins of Augustinian Priory of St Mary also known as Clontuskert Abbey is located 5 km south from Ballinasloe (just off road R355) in County Galway. It was founded in the 12th century by Turlough O'Connor (King of Connaught) on the site of an earlier monastery established in the 7th century by St Baeden but there are no surviving remains from that perio...   more info and photos

Knockbrack

Knockbrack

West Ireland | County Galway

Knockbrack, also known as Labbadermot is a megalithic monument situated on the seashore on the western side of Sallerna Bay, about 1.5 km west from fishing village of Cleggan, County Galway. The classification of this megalith leaves some doubt but the interpretation as a wedge tomb is the most likely. It's also hard to define the date of its construction b...   more info and photos

Kilmacduagh

Kilmacduagh

West Ireland | County Galway

Kilmacduagh (Cill Mhic Dhuach) was founded by St Colman Mac Duach early in the 7th century. Kilmacduagh has one of the finest collection of monastic, buildings in Ireland. The churches were plundered in the 13th century but the site remained the seat of a Bishop until the 16th century. The modern diocese still bears the name of the early monastery. ...   more info and photos